Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Will it rain?















For the past two days, big grey clouds have rolled into the sky, yielding no more than a few droplets - to our utter dismay.
WE NEED RAIN.

On the Central Coast where I live, we moved to Level 4 water restrictions two weeks ago. This means no garden watering, no car washing, no filling of pools, no outdoor use of water whatsoever. Car windows may be cleaned with a cloth and bucket, that’s all.
Level 1 water restrictions were introduced in February 2002. Level 2 in May 2004, Level 3 in June 2006 and finally Level 4 on October 1st, 2006. In this time span, the community’s water usage fell by about 30%.
"We acknowledge that people have already done a great deal to save water, said Gosford Mayor Laurie Maher, but with dam levels currently just below 16% we need to do even more. We are in the grip of the worst drought on record. Indeed 90% of NSW is also in drought so we need to respond accordingly.”
The current average consumption is 180 litres per person per day. The aim is to reduce it to 150 litres per day.
“Take shorter showers, use greywater on your garden, install a rainwater tank or put a brick in your single flush toilet cistern. Every drop counts.”
We abide of course, and I look at the sky: will it rain? So far, only a few drops…

8 comments:

Sally said...

Yes it's getting dire. Though much as we are urged to take individual responsibility (and we do) I think it is the "bigger picturez" of water wastage that is the real story - lack of recycling, not harvesting storm water, irrigating crops that are totally unsuited....etc.

I'm in Melb today and one story on the news is a massive new recycling plant in Bendigo.

Nathalie said...

You're absolutely right Sally, it looks like modern Australia has forgotten that this country was always a dry one, refusing to see and address forthcoming problems. They dried up the Murray and still some won't stop irrigation.

I'd love to think that this will be treated as a wake-up call but not so sure...

alice said...

Lors de notre -trop- bref passage sur cette côte superbe en 2004, nous avons été étonnés de constater le nombre de rivières à sec, notamment en remontant vers Bundaberg et Rockampton. Quand nous demandions comment on réglait le problème de l'eau dans ce beau pays, on nous a plusieurs fois répondu: pas de problème avec l'eau, on pompe dans le sous-sol et quand il n'y en a plus on va pomper plus loin...
Ici aussi, malgré la réputation de la Bretagne, l'eau devient rare et chère, polluée qui plus est. Ca m'angoisse beaucoup.

Meg Nakagawa said...

We've been hearing about it over here, too. I hope it rains, but failing that, I hope you don't have bush fire getting out of hand.

norman said...

In the 40s, when similar drought conditions prevailed, and there were no water meters or excess water charges, the population responded without the need of inspectors etc to enforce the restraints. But we now have more "rights". Obligations are either a thing of the past or something which applies to others.

Lavender Lady said...

I am sad to hear of your drought. I grew up in Oklahoma where water is precious. So much depends on it. Hopefully soon...

Bill said...

We have the oppsite problem in Delta. It seems like it has rained at least some, every day for the past month!

Anonymous said...

well now its pouring!!!
ebbye
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